1. Wooclap becomes free for K-12 schools

    4. September 2018 - 1 min. read
    We’re pleased to announce that our platform has become free for K-12 schools. Why did we choose to do so? By giving teachers free access, we want to contribute to what is most likely going to be the greatest challenge in years to come, namely the rise of technology in education. We do not believe teachers will become obsolete, but rather that their role in education must evolve. Rather than imparting knowledge for students to passively register, teachers will guide their students along the learning process.

    Wooclap's Integration into Office 365!

    29. May 2018 - 2 min. read
    In the spirit of the interaction we strive to introduce in classrooms and conference halls everywhere, let us ask you a couple of questions. Are you tired of PowerPoint presentations being a one-way street? Would you like to grant your slides the ability to draw information from your audience in real-time? If you reckon this sounds like some bad infomercial broadcasted on unknown TV channels in the middle of the day, then you know we’re about to offer a solution to all your problems - or at least the ones we’ve mentioned.

    The startup company Wooclap is working with Microsoft to make PowerPoint interactive

    8. June 2018 - 3 min. read
    In early 2015, Wooclap launched its platform and took part in one of the Microsoft Innovation Center’s programmes. Its founders wanted to use technology to promote interaction between higher education teachers and students in an innovative way. How? By answering questions using one’s own device. Three years and tens of thousands of users later, Wooclap is announcing the next step in its collaboration with Microsoft. What can Wooclap do? Wooclap is an online platform, on which teachers can create questions to ask their students during class.

    Education is the most difficult sector to automate

    3. July 2018 - 3 min. read
    Automation is disrupting industries and the employment sector by putting a lot of people out of work. According to the BBC, “up to 800 million global workers will lose their jobs by 2030 and be replaced by robotic automation” (29 November 2017,http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42170100). However, this might not be the case for the sector of education; a report by McKinsey & Co pointed out that from all the analysed sectors, the technical feasibility of automation in education is at the bottom of the list.

    Improving student performance through intrinsic motivation

    6. December 2018 - 3 min. read
    Motivation can be either intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation describes behaviour driven by internal rewards, that is behaviour one engages in because it is naturally satisfying, while extrinsically motivated behaviour stems from the expectation of external rewards like money and praise. Though a student’s drive or desire to learn can most often be traced to an external influence, be it impactful teachers or recurring evaluations, students with an internal drive to learn typically display more resolve and engage in more consistent action, making intrinsic motivation a valuable asset to possess.

    7 Ideas to Avoid Boring PowerPoint Presentations!

    30. January 2018 - 4 min. read
    We can assure you, an interactive powerpoint presentation is a memorable one. It encourages your audience to sit up straight and listen to what you are saying, rather than find the most comfortable sitting position to sleep in. A bored audience is a forgetful and undesirable one. To spare you and your listeners this ordeal, here are 7 ways Wooclap can wake up, excite, and inform your audience through entertaining interactions.

    Inviting curiosity and student involvement into the classroom

    19. June 2018 - 2 min. read
    We met with Cindy Lopes-Bento, Assistant Professor at Maastricht University, to discuss the way she uses Wooclap to improve student involvement and curiosity during her classes How do you use Wooclap ? I use Wooclap to make my lectures more interactive. During a 2h lecture, my main objective is to keep students involved. To this end, I use different Wooclap questions to add some interaction between me and the students as well as among students themselves.

    Script Concordance Test: what, why, and how?

    26. February 2019 - 2 min. read
    When Wooclap introduced a new feature, we usually skip straight to its look and how to use it. However, unlike most of our other interactions, the Script Concordance Test (SCT) might require a short introduction before we get to that. What is an SCT and why is it useful? According to Script concordance testing: from theory to practice, written by __ professors at Canada’s McGill Centre for Medical Education
  2. “Neuromania” in the classroom

    14. May 2019 - 4 min. read
    This article discusses: « neuromyths » as a result of the superficial interpretation of neuroscientific discoveries; how these « neuromyths » can adversely affect the politics of education why neuroscience is not the discipline best qualified to prescribe the most effective teaching methods and why the scientific literature from hybrid disciplines such as cognitive psychology and pedagogical field studies show that tools like Wooclap are of vital importance to education.

    New feature: Create folders in which to file your events

    7. May 2019 - 1 min. read
    Many among you requested it, so we made it happen! Start organising your events in folders today and manage them more easily. Find out all there is to know about folders here! Any thoughts? Share your feedback and suggestions with us! Try wooclap for the first time! Sign up for free

    Script Concordance Test: what, why, and how?

    26. February 2019 - 2 min. read
    When Wooclap introduced a new feature, we usually skip straight to its look and how to use it. However, unlike most of our other interactions, the Script Concordance Test (SCT) might require a short introduction before we get to that. What is an SCT and why is it useful? According to Script concordance testing: from theory to practice, written by __ professors at Canada’s McGill Centre for Medical Education

    Coming Soon: Our New Design!

    12. February 2019 - 1 min. read
    For the past few months, we have been working hard to make the “Wooclap event” interface — commonly referred to as the dashboard —more user-friendly. Here’s what you can expect from the new design: A familiar structure An event still consists of three tabs; the votes, the messages, and the participant pace. Following user requests, we have implemented some changes to make your experience more enjoyable. Quick access to event settings All event settings are within reach, regardless of the tab in which you are currently working.

    Wooclap raises €1.4 million to better captivate students

    8. February 2019 - 2 min. read
    Wooclap, the interactive platform which facilitates in-class student participation, recently closed a funding round to help it reach its objective of leading the European market within the next two years. The company raised €1.4 million from Alain Dehaze (CEO of The Adecco Group), Pierre-Olivier Beckers (former CEO of Delhaize), and its previous investors. 60 000 convinced teachers in more than 100 countries Launched in early 2015 by Sébastien Lebbe (CEO) and Jonathan Alzetta (CTO), the start-up’s EdTech platform is currently used by more than 60,000 teachers in more than 100 countries.

    Non-cognitive factors and their impact on student performance

    15. January 2019 - 3 min. read
    https://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/uk/15/01/best-means-measure Because most schools and institutions of higher education rely on grades and results to measure their students’ success, their teaching methods tend to focus on the traditional academic skills required to perform well within those measures. Thus, some important factors — mostly non-cognitive factors —are ignored, while their influence on student performance has already been found to be significant. Members of the University of Chicago Consortium on School Research have created a model depicting the undeniable link between these non-cognitive factors — students’ behaviours, beliefs, mindsets, and social-emotional skills — and academic performance.

    Improving student performance through intrinsic motivation

    6. December 2018 - 3 min. read
    Motivation can be either intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation describes behaviour driven by internal rewards, that is behaviour one engages in because it is naturally satisfying, while extrinsically motivated behaviour stems from the expectation of external rewards like money and praise. Though a student’s drive or desire to learn can most often be traced to an external influence, be it impactful teachers or recurring evaluations, students with an internal drive to learn typically display more resolve and engage in more consistent action, making intrinsic motivation a valuable asset to possess.

    Student mindset: fixed vs growth

    27. November 2018 - 3 min. read
    A student’s mindset tells you how they deal with failure and success in a learning environment, and reflects the image they have of their own learning potential. It describes their understanding of what it means to learn, and is therefore a great influence on their motivation and the habits they will develop for further learning. Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck discerns two main types of student mindset: growth and fixed.

    When is multitasking beneficial?

    15. November 2018 - 3 min. read
    According to most cognitive scientists, performing even two relatively complex mental tasks at once is practically impossible for the average person, unless one of them has been completely automatised through practice. What people usually do when they think they are multitasking is actually task switching, or alternating between tasks over short periods of time, which causes a loss in efficiency. Different tasks have different objectives and rules to attain them, which means that every time we move from one task to another, different objectives and rules must be taken into consideration.

    Implementing and combining different teaching strategies

    8. November 2018 - 3 min. read
    One of the greatest issues of today’s education is its short-term focus on academic results and the lack of importance attributed to long-term learning and understanding. The consequence in terms of learning strategies is the overwhelming practice of cramming among students of all ages, despite the long-standing proof that spreading learning across numerous shorter sessions is far more effective for the creation of durable memories than fewer longer studying sessions.

    Change things up with Interleaving

    30. October 2018 - 3 min. read
    Interleaving is a highly effective learning and teaching strategy, which means it can be applied by both students at home and teachers in class. It involves distributing practice of a topic over time, as well as mixing up the order of materials studied across different topics. For example, three hours of learning three separate topics one after the other are transformed into six 30-minute sessions, alternating the different subjects. The benefits of this method stem from two other learning strategies, the first of which is spaced practice, otherwise known as the opposite of cramming, which essentially means studying more often, but for shorter intervals.

    Why cramming does not work in the long-term, and a better learning technique to replace it with

    23. October 2018 - 3 min. read
    When studying for a test, most students use a method called massed practice, or as it is commonly known, cramming. The issue teachers find with learners studying intensively days or hours before the test, is that they often achieve their goal, namely successfully passing the assessment, but they couldn’t recall the information weeks, or even days later. The real problem is that, in today’s education, grades are more highly valued than developing a deep and durable understanding of the course material.

    Retrieval Practice: A simple strategy to improve learning inside and outside the classroom

    16. October 2018 - 4 min. read
    Retrieval practice is a well-known learning strategy which involves calling information to mind that has been previously stored in long-term memory. It is a straightforward and easily implemented tactic with an undeniable impact on learning, and relies on three arguments. First, trying to recall a memory can modify, reorganise, and consolidate it better in our long-term memory. Second, that action often creates additional retrieval pathways to that memory, making it easier to retrieve later on.

    Asking questions: How to ensure long-lasting memories

    10. October 2018 - 3 min. read
    When a teacher asks a student a question in class, they are providing that student with a retrieval cue, which refers to any information from their surrounding environment that triggers the process of memory retrieval. Let’s have a look at two important types of recall that can be used for learning, namely cued recall and free recall. Cued recall refers to “_any specific visual or verbal cue provided to students with the intention of eliciting a specific memory_”.

    Two ways for teachers to improve how much their students remember

    2. October 2018 - 2 min. read
    There are two important ways in which teachers can improve how much students will remember of what they have been taught in class. The first is to link new information to students’ prior knowledge (known as active learning), and the second is to limit how much information students process at any one time (to avoid cognitive overloading). Link new information to prior knowledge To learn something, which means to make durable memories, we need to link the new information we are being taught to what already exists in our memories.

    Why teachers need to understand how memory works

    26. September 2018 - 3 min. read
    No matter how engaging a teacher, if they are not able to make the information they teach enter the long-term memories of their students, those students will end up having learnt very little. Using the memory model above, we can see that depending on how the information is processed by students in their short-term memory, it may or may not be moved into long-term memory for storage and later use. How is the selection made for which information is processed?
  3. Wooclap raises €1.4 million to better captivate students

    8. February 2019 - 2 min. read
    Wooclap, the interactive platform which facilitates in-class student participation, recently closed a funding round to help it reach its objective of leading the European market within the next two years. The company raised €1.4 million from Alain Dehaze (CEO of The Adecco Group), Pierre-Olivier Beckers (former CEO of Delhaize), and its previous investors. 60 000 convinced teachers in more than 100 countries Launched in early 2015 by Sébastien Lebbe (CEO) and Jonathan Alzetta (CTO), the start-up’s EdTech platform is currently used by more than 60,000 teachers in more than 100 countries.

    Wooclap in Brazilian Portuguese

    4. September 2018 - 1 min. read
    While travelling around the world during summer holidays, Wooclap met some lovely Brazilian people, who offered to teach it their native language. Eager to learn, and not being one to ignore a challenge, the platform got to studying, and though it may not yet have completely mastered the language, Brazilian users can expect to be greeted with a friendly “Olá” pretty soon. Once perfected, this will be Wooclap’s seventh language, having already learned French, Dutch, English, German, Spanish, and Russian in the past three and a half years.

    Wooclap becomes free for K-12 schools

    4. September 2018 - 1 min. read
    We’re pleased to announce that our platform has become free for K-12 schools. Why did we choose to do so? By giving teachers free access, we want to contribute to what is most likely going to be the greatest challenge in years to come, namely the rise of technology in education. We do not believe teachers will become obsolete, but rather that their role in education must evolve. Rather than imparting knowledge for students to passively register, teachers will guide their students along the learning process.

    Education is the most difficult sector to automate

    3. July 2018 - 3 min. read
    Automation is disrupting industries and the employment sector by putting a lot of people out of work. According to the BBC, “up to 800 million global workers will lose their jobs by 2030 and be replaced by robotic automation” (29 November 2017,http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-42170100). However, this might not be the case for the sector of education; a report by McKinsey & Co pointed out that from all the analysed sectors, the technical feasibility of automation in education is at the bottom of the list.

    Good Wooclap Hunting!

    12. June 2018 - 3 min. read
    We made it 🙌! Wooclap is being launched on Product Hunt TODAY, and we’d like to invite you all to share our excitement! Btw: Big up to Bram Kanstein for launching us ❤! For those among you who don’t know, Product hunt is a website that launches the best and newest products on a daily basis. It’s a place for product-loving enthusiasts to share and geek out about the latest mobile apps, websites, hardware projects, and tech creations.

    The startup company Wooclap is working with Microsoft to make PowerPoint interactive

    8. June 2018 - 3 min. read
    In early 2015, Wooclap launched its platform and took part in one of the Microsoft Innovation Center’s programmes. Its founders wanted to use technology to promote interaction between higher education teachers and students in an innovative way. How? By answering questions using one’s own device. Three years and tens of thousands of users later, Wooclap is announcing the next step in its collaboration with Microsoft. What can Wooclap do? Wooclap is an online platform, on which teachers can create questions to ask their students during class.

    Wooclap's Integration into Office 365!

    29. May 2018 - 2 min. read
    In the spirit of the interaction we strive to introduce in classrooms and conference halls everywhere, let us ask you a couple of questions. Are you tired of PowerPoint presentations being a one-way street? Would you like to grant your slides the ability to draw information from your audience in real-time? If you reckon this sounds like some bad infomercial broadcasted on unknown TV channels in the middle of the day, then you know we’re about to offer a solution to all your problems - or at least the ones we’ve mentioned.

    Здравствуйте to our Russian users!

    15. May 2018 - 1 min. read
    Trying to keep up with Wooclap’s ever-growing fan club, we’re proud to announce that its entire platform is now available in Russian! This is already the sixth language Wooclap has learned, in half as many years. Experts say it may one day even create its very own language, a combination of cheers (woo’s) and applause (claps) that would render any obstacle to global communication and understanding speechless (pun very much intended).

    Wooclap integrates Moodle to simplify your classroom

    20. March 2018 - 1 min. read
    Many among you asked us to do it, and we just did! Users will now be able to import questionnaires from Moodle to Wooclap, and vice-versa. Thank you to all the teachers and pedagogical engineers who continuously help us with the development of our platform. We strive to answer every one of your needs, by offering you the greatest possible tool. To that end, other integrations will soon be unveiled.

    Wooclap’s Brand NEW releases!

    23. January 2018 - 1 min. read
    The Wooclap team is kicking off 2018 with several exciting product updates & new features 🤩 ! All of these have been designed to make our platform even more powerful, awesome and enjoyable to use. Matching Prioritisation Sorting Fill in the blanks Many other NEW features will follow SOON, such as a MAJOR redesign of the interface, so keep an eye open 😉 ! As always, let us know if you have any suggestions.